Press Release: Faces & Phases

IF A PICTURE PAINTS A THOUSAND WORDS, WHAT ABOUT A PAINTED FACE?

The Historical Society of Woodstock will present “FACES & PHASES,” an exhibition of paintings and hand-painted mannequins by Barbara Graff, on display Saturdays and Sundays from 1 – 5 PM, October 7 - 29  at the historic Eames House (20 Comeau Drive, Woodstock, NY 12498). Opening Reception on Saturday, October 7th from 2 - 4 PM will feature musical performances by  Master Michael Quinn & Jeff Allyn Szwast, and Danielle Cardona & Martin Luque. Admission is free.   

FACES & PHASES:  Paintings & Hand-painted Mannequins by Barbara Graff

This collection of oil paintings & mannequins explores a mysterious world of dark forests, twisted tree roots, forgotten slippers, and the changing night sky. Strong women, in veils and capes are presented in all stages of aging. Men exist as memories or shadows. Time presides over all.

Artist Bio:

New York artist Barbara Graff was raised in the Catskill Region near the famous town of Woodstock. After building a career in New York City, Barbara returned to the Hudson Valley to create a studio at home in the natural world which inspires all of her work. Masks play an important role in her paintings, which illustrate Barbara’s fascination with the human face. The variety of media and texture used in her work can be attributed to her years of experience working in the fashion display industry, creating another reputation for herself as one of the most sought after “makeup” (oil paint) artists for mannequins worldwide.

Artist Statement:

The nature paintings are a search for, and celebration of, the beauty of the earth. The paintings inspire a fresh way of seeing a world familiar to many, the natural world which is around us, and a part of us. The paintings draw the viewer into the scene. This outer world connects with the viewer’s inner world and they become one. The paintings allow the viewer to look beyond appearance and locate within themselves the acute awareness of an inner truth. 

The portrait paintings are part of a series of feminine figures representational of a search for autonomy. Many of them are veiled. Beyond facades of masks (including beauty), the paintings maintain there is a soul in some stage of development. The development is one we all experience: the struggle for self-discovery and, ultimately, actualization.

For more information visit www.HistoricalSocietyofWoodstock.org and www.facebook.com/historical.woodstock or write Historical Society of Woodstock, P.O. Box 841, Woodstock, NY 12498.

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Letitia Smith,
Jun 26, 2017, 6:58 AM
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